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What's in a name: Fenton Parade

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by rob, Feb 19, 2014.

  1. rob Administrator

    I was having a browse through licensing applications and saw one has just gone in for a new Sainsbury's Local at the development on the old hospital site. More interesting than a new supermarket convenience store is the choice of name for a new "road" in the development. The licensing application reveals that it's to be called Fenton Parade.

    The "Fenton" surely comes from Lavinia Fenton, an 18th century actress who died at a grand property called Westcombe House and was buried at St Alfege church (although nothing seems to record where her grave was at St Alfege, according to local historian Linda Cunningham).

    Fenton's most famous role was as Polly Peachum in the Beggar's Opera, which is where Peachum Road off Humber Road gets its name.

    I've not really touched on Fenton's colourful life but more about that can be found here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lavinia_Fenton
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/3640507/An-era-takes-off-its-mask.html
    http://www.thegreenwichphantom.co.uk/2008/01/lavinia-fenton/

    Any thoughts on the choice? Any suggestions for anyone else that should be honoured with a road named after them?
  2. Mary Member

  3. rob Administrator

    Thanks Mary. One thought I had is that if you were sufficiently well regarded to have a building named after you but that building is later pulled down (thinking Peggy Middleton and John Humphries), should the name automatically go on to the pre approved list to be used for something else.
  4. Alan Palmer Member

    I'm coming to this rather late, but I don't believe the name should go on a 'pre approved list' as such, but perhaps be put on a short list automatically. Many buildings and roads are named after people who, not to put too fine a point on it, were quite nondescript with the benefit of hindsight.

    That said, I'd love to see Will Crooks, the trade unionist and early Labour politician, remembered again in some way. One of the old paddle steamers working the Woolwich Ferry was named after him, but that was scrapped in 1963. Come to think of it, I'd love to see the old paddle steamers back as well, but I suppose that's just nostalgia. :cool:
  5. Mary Member

    Alan - that's fine, but there is already a Will Crooks Gardens in Kidbrooke and they don't like using a name twice.
  6. Alan Palmer Member

    Yes, according to the Wikipedia article there's also a council estate in Poplar named after him, situated near where he was born. At least that has some close connection to him; admittedly Kidbrooke does appear to have been within his old Woolwich parliamentary constituency, but since it was probably countryside at the time, I doubt that he spent much time there.
  7. Mary Member

    Yes - I used to have quite a bit to do with the Will Crooks Estate when I worked in Docklands. I tried to get them involved with Woolwich historians - but they were all a bit 'what do you mean - south of the river!!'.
    Alan Palmer and rob like this.
  8. Alan Palmer Member

    That's why naming one of the paddle steamers after him was ideal. The Thames, at least, links as well as divides us.

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